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Fulbright Scholar and Artist to Speak at GHC

Ana Terry, Fulbright scholar in residence at Southern Polytechnic State University, will speak to Georgia Highlands students, faculty and staff in two presentations on Wednesday, Oct. 30 at 9:30 and 11 a.m. in the Cartersville Student Centerís room 102A.† Terry will discuss the culture and art of the Maori, the native people of New Zealand, as well as her own art.† A native New Zealander, she has also lived in China and Columbia.† She teaches several classes at Southern Poly and lectures at nearby colleges and other organizations as part of her residency duties.

Terry has worked in graphic design since 1996.† She has lectured in electronic arts and photography at Ortago Polytechnic, and was a teaching fellow in the Design Studies department of the University of Ortago.† Her art projects have been featured in several solo exhibitions.† As a New Zealander she is very familiar with Maori culture and its influence on New Zealand life.

The Maori are a Polynesian people with a distinct culture that has influenced modern New Zealand.† Archeologists believe they settled New Zealand about 1280 A.D.† Undiscovered for another 500 years, they established a distinct culture that includes its own language, mythology and art.† The Maori produced great artistry in painting, elaborate wood carvings, and the performing arts.

The Maori people are well known for their use of ta moko Ė the artistic use of facial tattooing to illustrate the wearerís family, status, origin and exploits.† They are also known for their historical practice of mokomokai, the ceremonial preservation of the deceasedís tattooed head.† The practice was believed to be sacred and assisted the dead in returning to Hawaiki, their ancestral homeland.† The heads of enemies, particularly enemy chiefs killed in battle, were also preserved as trophies of war; while the return and exchange of mokomokai often symbolized a peace offering between warring tribes.

Todayís Maori community is a blend of traditional and contemporary art, folklore and European influence.†

The entire student body, faculty and staff are invited to the sessions.† If youíre interested in art, travel or the culture of Pacific islanders, youíll want to arrange your schedule to attend.

Page last updated: October 23, 2013