2121 BRITISH LITERATURE I

LINKS/SUPPLEMENTAL COURSE  INFORMATION

These websites below offer helpful information for unit study guides and for supplemental research for class presentations, class documented  essays,  and research papers. 
To see a listing of all of the selections in the class text, The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Vol. I, which is used for this course, scroll to the end of the list.

The class syllabus has selected literature from the text. However, for students who are searching for a research project topic, this is not a conclusive list of the topics you may select. You must get approval of a topic from your professor after submitting a proposal and working bibliography for that project. Your research project can be either an oral presentation or a research paper.

 

WEB COMPANION TO OUR TEXTBOOK: THE ANTHOLOGY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (WW NORTON, PUBLISHING CO.)

http://www.wwnorton.com/nael/

500 B. C.- 1000 A.D. ANGLO-SAXON LITERATURE
CELTIC HERITAGE/LANDMARKS/STONHENGE

www.ibiblio.org/gaelic/celts.html
www.rook.org/heritage/celt/celt.html
www.witcombe.sbc.edu/earthmysteries/EMStonehenge.html
www.christiann.com/
www.stonehenge.co.uk/
www.activemind.com/Mysterious/Topics/Stonehenge/
www.exn.ca/mysticplaces/stonehenge.asp
www.sacredsites.com/europe/englands/stonehenge.html

 

CELTIC RELIGION/MYTHOLOGY

www.celtdigital.org/celtrel.htm
www.heartoscotland.com/Categories/CelticMythology.htm
www.arthsoc.drruss.net/Cauldron/celtic.html
www.altreligion.about.com/od/druidry/
www.celticgrounds.com/chapters/c-religion.htm

www.draeconin.com/database/celtreli.htm
www.llewellynencycolpedia.com/article/187

 

 

 

ANGLO-SAXON/SCANDINAVIAN HERITAGE LANDMARKS/HERITAGE--SUTTON HOO –VIKING BURIAL SHIP

www.suttonhoo.org/

www.nationaltrust.org.uk/places/suttonhoo/

csis.pace.edu/grendel/projs4a/sutton.htm

www.wuffings.co.uk/MySHPages/SHPage.html

www.britainexpress.com/History/sutton-hoo.htm

www.archaeology.co.uk/ca/ timeline/saxon/suttonhoo/suttonhoo.htm

tsa.ucsf.edu/~snlrc/britannia/suttonhoo/suttonhoo.html

 

Beowulf: Scyld Scefing and Sutton Hoo
www.fortunecity.com/victorian/eliot/722/Sutthoo.htm

 

OLD ENGLISH: BEOWULF , THE BEOWULF POET, & “CAEDMON’S HYMN” IN VENERABLE BEDE’S: ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH PEOPLE:

CAEDMON’S HYMN IN OLD ENGLISH and translated (2nd url below):

http://www.ling.upenn.edu/courses/hum100/caedmon.html
www.rado.sk/old_english/texts/Hymn.html
www.heorot.dk/bede-caedmon.html
www.cla.calpoly.edu/~dschwart/engl512/bede.htm
www.shelterbelt.com/BRITISH/caedmon.html

BEOWULF SITES—VERY HELPFUL:

http://www.lnstar.com/literature/beowulf/

(notes and study questions—scroll down)

www.cla.calpoly.edu/~dschwart/engl512/bede.html

BEOWULF IN OLD ENGLISH

http://www.georgetown.edu/labyrinth/library/oe/texts/a4.1.html

 OLD ENGLISH LITERATURE TEXTS SITE:

http://www.georgetown.edu/labyrinth/library/oe/oe.html
http://www.georgetown.edu/cball/hwaet/hwaet06.html
http://www.kami.demon.co.uk/gesithas/readings/readings.html

 

12, 13, AND 14TH CENTURIES: MEDIEVAL LITERATURE

MEDEVAL DRAMA (LITURGICAL) MIRACLE, MYSTERY, MORALITY PLAYS

 

www.montreat.edu/dking/MiddleEnglishLit/NotesonMedievalDrama.htm

www.academics.vmi.edu/english/medrama.html

www.wsu.edu/~hanly/drama/drama.html

www.lib.rochester.edu/CAMELOT/playbib.htm

www.luminarium.org/medlit/plays.htm

www.novaonline.nvcc.edu/eli/spd130et/medieval.htm

www.fordham.edu/HALSALL/basis/everyman.html

 

 

Everyman
www.darkwing.uoregon.edu/~rbear/everyman.html

 

Shepherd's Play
www.eng.fju.edu.tw/iacd_99F/medieval_lit/data/Shepherd.html

www.encyclopedia.com/html/S/SecondSh.asp

www.glc.k12.ga.us/BuilderV03/LPTools/LPShared/lpdisplay.asp?LPID=15914

www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/5567/ssp.html

www.calvin.edu/academic/engl/215/ssp.htm

 

Second Shepherds' Play study questions

www.cla.calpoly.edu/~dschwart/engl203/2ndsh203.html

www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0844258.html

www.bartleby.com/65/se/SecondSh.html

 MIDDLE AGES, MIDDLE ENGLISH AND THE CANTERBURY TALES, CHAUCER

BACKGROUND ON THE MIDDLE AGES:
http://www.learner.org/exhibits/middleages/feudal.html

TRANSLATIONS OF TALES FROM MIDDLE ENGLISH TO MODERN ENGLISH:
http://icg.harvard.edu/~chaucer/
 

MIDDLE ENGLISH AND MODERN ENGLISH VERSIONS:
http://icg.fas.harvard.edu/~chaucer/teachslf/tr-index.htm
 

CHAUCER’S CANTERBURY TALES:
http://www.geocities.com/mscorbin20/chaucer.html http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/canterbury/
www.librarius.com/cantales.htm

www.librarius.com/

www.icg.fas.harvard.edu/~chaucer/cantales.html

www.hosting.uaa.alaska.edu/afdtk/ECT_Main.htm

www.siue.edu/CHAUCER/

www.canterburytales.org/

www.academic.brooklyn.cuny.edu/webcore/murphy/canterbury/

www.sparknotes.com/lit/canterbury/

www.bl.uk/treasures/caxton/homepage.html

www.gradesaver.com/classicnotes/titles/canterbury/

 

 

SIR GAWAIN AND THE GREEN KNIGHT, THE PEARL POET

http://www.ramsdale.org/legend.htm
http://www.mala.bc.ca/~black/gawain.asc

http://www.legends.dm.net/kingarthur/

http://www.arthuriana.co.uk/

 

THE ARTHURIAN LEGEND--OVERVIEW
http://www.legends.dm.net/kingarthur/
http://academics.vmi.edu/english/arthur.html

Music and the Arthurian legend:

http://www.uidaho.edu/student_orgs/arthurian_legend/game/music/arthur.htm

http://www.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/acpbibs/genbib.htm

Women and the Arthurian legend:

http://www.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/wmnshome.htm

THE SIR GAWAIN "ROOM"

http://www.livinghistory.co.uk/homepages/sirgawain/

INTRODUCTION TO AND NOTES ON SIR GAWAIN

AND THE GREEN KNIGHT:

http://www.mala.bc.ca/~black/gawain.asc

http://www.livinghistory.co.uk/homepages/sirgawain/

SUMMARY OF SIR GAWAIN AND THE GREEN KNIGHT

http://www.livinghistory.co.uk/homepages/sirgawain/

INFO ON THE CHARACTERS AND ESSAYS ABOUT SIR GAWAIN AND THE GREEN KNIGHT & GAWAIN'S CHARACTER

http://www174.pair.com/mja/Gawain.htm

LINKS TO REFERENCES ON THE POEM—SEE       
FIRST TABLE  IN THE SITE BELOW  ARE THE
IMPORTANT ONES FOR OUR CLASS:

http://www.wol.pace.edu/grendel/proj2b/main.html

ESSAY ON THE FORBIDDEN FRUIT, TEMPTATION, AND GAWAIN
http://members.tripod.com/~proclus/essay.html

ESSAY RE: SIR GAWAIN AND THE GREEN KNIGHT

http://www.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/teams/greenint.htm

ROLE OF WOMEN-- IN SIR GAWAIN AND THE
GREEN KNIGHT-
http://www.shss.montclair.edu/english/furr/arkin.html

THE HUNT--SIR GAWAIN AND THE GREEN KNIGHT

http://www.livinghistory.co.uk/homepages/sirgawain/

http://www.livinghistory.co.uk/homepages/sirgawain/

THE WHITE CASTLE OF BERTILAK--THE KNIGHT WHO IS REALLY THE GREEN KNIGHT. THE CASTLE IS NAMED HAUTDESERT:

http://www.livinghistory.co.uk/homepages/sirgawain/

THE QUESTIONING OF GAWAIN'S MASCULINITY IN SIR GAWAIN AND THE GREEN KNIGHT

http://www.livinghistory.co.uk/homepages/sirgawain/


MORTE D’ARTHUR , MALLORY

 Sir Thomas Mallory and Morte D’ Arthur

http://www.luminarium.org/medlit/malory.htm
http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/Mal1Mor.html

15TH AND 16TH CENTURIES: THE RENAISSANCE

SHAKESPEAREAN AND JACOBEAN DRAMA

GLOBE THEATER (SHAKESPEAREAN THEATER)

http://virtual.clemson.edu/caah/Shakespr/VRGLOBE/                

http://www.calvin.edu/academic/engl/346/proj/nathan/globe.htm

http://www.globesw.org/Main.htm

http://www.allshakespeare.com/globe/47517

HAMLET
http://www.greatbuildings.com/buildings/Globe_Theater.html

http://www.pathguy.com/hamlet.htm
http://www.hamlet.org/
http://www.humboldt.k12.ca.us/bridgeville_sd/info/swp/hamlet/
http://nd.essortment.com/shakespearehaml_rmoi.htm
http://www.legends.dm.net/shakespeare/hamlet.html
 http://www.netcomuk.co.uk/~iandel/index.html
http://mason.gmu.edu/~nfarrell/web2.html
http://www.absoluteshakespeare.com/guides/hamlet/hamlet.htm
http://www.allshakespeare.com/hamlet.php
http://nd.essortment.com/shakespearehaml_rmoi.htm
http://www.shakespearetavern.com/
http://www.shakespeares-globe.org/
CHRISTOPHER MARLOWE’S FAUSTUS

www.faculty.goucher.edu/eng211/Marlowe.html

www.sparknotes.com/lit/doctorfaustus/

www.english.uga.edu/cdesmet/tiffany/faustus.htm

www.csuchico.edu/~goulding/faust/faustlinks.htm

www.wwnorton.com/nto/16century/topic_1/explorations.htm

www.h05.cgpublisher.com/proposals/24/manage_workspace

 

Dr. Faustus Study Questions

www.cla.calpoly.edu/~dschwart/engl331/faustus.html

www.hants.org.uk/ssa/faustus/faust.htm

KING LEAR
OVERVIEWS/NOTES --THEME, CHARACTERS, PLOT
http://www.pathguy.com/kinglear.htm

http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/bookcase/lear/info.shtml

www.sparknotes.com/shakespeare/lear/

www.netexplosure.com/kinglear/

www.gradesaver.com/classicnotes/titles/kinglear/

home.pacific.net.au/~greg.hub/lear.html

 

THE FOLLOWING LECTURES ARE EXCERPTED FROM A BOOK ENTITLED SHAKESPEAREAN TRAGEDY BY A. C. BRADLEY (SEE ABOVE FOR INFO. ABOUT THIS FAMOUS PROFESSOR, CRITIC, AND AUTHOR):

http://www.clicknotes.com/bradley/tr243.html

http://www.clicknotes.com/bradley/tr280.html

http://www.clicknotes.com/bradley/tr40.html

 

TEXTS/INTERPRETATIONS—KING LEAR
lahttp://www.online-literature.com/Shakespeare/kinglear/

http://rryavisbrown.homestead.com/files/Lear/lear_home.htm

www-tech.mit.edu/Shakespeare/lear/

17TH &  18TH CENTURIES: MONARCHY VS THE COMMONWEALTH

METAPHYSICAL POETRY

JOHN DONNE’S POETRY:

Sonnet 14

http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/sevenessay.htm#donne

 “The Flea”

http://www.chalacyn.com/%7Etalyce/text/flea.html

 Donne’s love poetry:

http://www.lexcie.zetnet.co.uk/fudge/donne.htm

http://www.english-literature.org/essays/donne.html

 

 GEORGE HERBERT’S POETRY: http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/sevenessay.htm#herbert

 CAVALIER POETRY

RICHARD LOVELACE’S POETRY:

http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/sevenessay.htm#lovelace

 ANDREW MARVELL’S POETRY:

http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/sevenessay.htm#marvell

 ROBERT HERRICK’S POETRY:

www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/herrick/

www.bartleby.com/217.0105.html

www.poemhunter.com/robert-herrick/poet-3115/

  THE PURITAN LITERARY OR ART EPIC

JOHN MILTON’S PARADISE LOST

http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/sevenessay.htm#milton

http://www.paradiselost.org/

http://www.sparknotes.com/poetry/paradiselost/

http://zenvirus.com/essays/milton-satan-essay.html

http://tom.digitalelite.com/miltonssatan.htm

http://stjohns-chs.org/english/gothic/works/satanhero.html

 *CONTENTS OF The Norton Anthology of English Literature, TEXT FOR British Literature I, ENGLISH 2111

 

THE MIDDLE AGES (TO CA. 1485)

Introduction

*Timeline

ANGLO-SAXON ENGLAND

BEDE (ca. 673–735) and CÆDMON’S HYMN

An Ecclesiastical History of the English People

[The Story of Cædmon]

THE DREAM OF THE ROOD

+ *BEOWULF translated by Seamus Heaney

The Last Survivor’s Speech in Old English with Verse Translation

THE WANDERER

*THE WIFE’S LAMENT

THE BATTLE OF MALDON

ANGLO-NORMAN ENGLAND

*THE ANGLO-SAXON CHRONICLE

*[Obituary for William the Conqueror]

*[Henry of Poitou becomes abbot of Peterborough]

*[The reign of King Stephen]

*LEGENDARY HISTORIES OF BRITAIN

*GEOFFREY OF MONMOUTH

*The History of the Kings of Britain

*[The Story of Brutus and Diana’s Prophecy]

ii

*WACE (ca. 1110–1180)

*Le Roman de Brut

*[The Roman Challenge]

*LAYAMON

*Brut

*[Arthur’s Dream]

*THE MYTH OF ARTHUR’S RETURN

*Geoffrey of Monmouth: From History of the Kings of Britain

*Wace: From Roman de Brut

*Layamon: From Brut

*MARIE DE FRANCE

*Lanval

*Fables

*The Wolf and the Lamb

*The Wolf and the Sow

*CELTIC CONTEXTS

*Exile of the Sons of Uisliu

*Lludd and Lleuelys

*ANCRENE RIWLE (Rule for Anchoresses)

*[The Parable of the Christ- Knight]

MIDDLE ENGLISH LITERATURE IN THE FOURTEENTH

AND FIFTEENTH CENTURIES

+ SIR GAWAIN AND THE GREEN KNIGHT (ca. 1375–1400)

GEOFFREY CHAUCER (ca. 1343–1400)

THE CANTERBURY TALES

The General Prologue

The Miller’s Prologue and Tale

The Prologue

The Tale

*Man of Law’s Epilogue

The Wife of Bath’s Prologue and Tale

The Prologue

The Tale

The Pardoner’s Prologue and Tale

The Introduction

The Prologue

The Tale

iii

The Epilogue

The Nun’s Priest’s Tale

The Parson’s Tale

The Introduction

Chaucer’s Retraction

LYRICS AND OCCASIONAL VERSE

*Troilus’s Song

Truth

To His Scribe Adam Complaint to His Purse

WILLIAM LANGLAND (ca. 1330–1387)

The Vision of Piers Plowman

The Prologue

[The Field of Folk]

Passus 5

[The Confession of Envy]

[The Confession of Gluttony]

[Piers Plowman Shows the Way to Saint Truth]

Passus 6

[The Plowing of Piers’s Half-Acre]

Passus 18

[The Harrowing of Hell]

The C-Text

[The Dreamer Meets Conscience and Reason]

MIDDLE ENGLISH LYRICS

The Cuckoo Song

Alison

My Lief Is Faren in Londe

Western Wind

I Am of Ireland

*What is He, this lordling, that cometh from the fight

*Ye That Pasen by the Weye

Sunset on Calvary

I Sing of a Maiden

Adam Lay Bound

The Corpus Christi Carol

JULIAN OF NORWICH (1342–ca. 1416)

A Book of Showings to the Anchoress Julian of Norwich

[The First Revelation]

Chapter 3

Chapter 4

iv

Chapter 5

*From Chapter 7

*Chapter 27

[Jesus as Mother]

*From Chapter 58

*From Chapter 59

*Chapter 60

*Chapter 61

[Conclusion]

Chapter 86

MARGERY KEMPE (ca. 1373–1438)

The Book of Margery Kempe

[The Birth of Her First Child and Her First Vision]

[Her Pride and Attempts to Start a Business]

[Margery and Her Husband Reach a Settlement]

[A Visit with Julian of Norwich]

[Pilgrimage to Jerusalem]

[Examination before the Archbishop]

*[Margery Nurses Her Husband in His Old Age]

MYSTERY PLAYS

+ The Chester Play of Noah’s Flood

+ The Wakefield Second Shepherds’ Play

SIR THOMAS MALORY (ca. 1405–1471)

Morte Darthur

[The Conspiracy against Lancelot and Guinevere]

[War Breaks Out between Arthur and Lancelot]

[The Death of Arthur]

[The Deaths of Lancelot and Guinevere]

*ROBERT HENRYSON (ca. 1425–ca. 1500)

*The Cock and the Fox

+ EVERYMAN (after 1485)

THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY (1485–1603)

Introduction

*Timeline

JOHN SKELTON (ca. 1460–1529)

Mannerly Margery Milk and Ale

Lullay, lullay, like a child

v

*The Tunning of Elinour Rumming

*Secundus Passus

SIR THOMAS MORE (1478–1535)

Utopia

Book 1

[More Meets a Returned Traveler]

Book 2

[The Geography of Utopia]

[Their Gold and Silver]

[Marriage Customs]

[Religions]

[Conclusion]

The History of King Richard III

[A King’s Mistress]

SIR THOMAS WYATT THE ELDER (1503–1542)

The long love that in my thought doth harbor

Whoso list to hunt

Farewell, Love

My galley

Divers doth use

Madam, withouten many words

They flee from me

The Lover Showeth How He Is Forsaken of Such as He Sometime Enjoyed

My lute, awake!

And wilt thou leave me thus?

Forget not yet

Blame not my lute

*Stand whoso list

Who list his wealth and ease retain

Mine own John Poins

*LITERATURE OF THE SACRED

*THE ENGLISH BIBLE

*From Tyndale’s Translation

*From The Geneva Bible

*From The Douay-Rheims Version

*From The Authorized (King James) Version

vi

*WILLIAM TYNDALE: The Obedience of a Christian Man

*[The Forgiveness of Sins]

*[Scriptural Interpretation]

*JOHN CALVIN: The Institution of Christian Religion

*From Book 3, Chapter 21

*ANNE ASKEW: The First Examination of Anne Askew

*JOHN FOXE: Acts and Monuments

*[The Death of Anne Askew]

*The Words and Behavior of the Lady Jane [Grey] upon the Scaffold

*BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER From The Form of Solemnization of Matrimony

*BOOK OF HOMILIES: From An Homily Against Disobedience and Willful

Rebellion

RICHARD HOOKER: Of the Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity

Book 1, Chapter 3

[On the Several Kinds of Law, and on the Natural Law]

Book 1, Chapter 10

[The Foundations of Society]

ROGER ASCHAM (1515–1568)

*Toxophilus

*The Second Book of the School of Shooting

[Comeliness]

The Schoolmaster

The First Book for the Youth

[Teaching Latin]

[A Talk with Lady Jane Grey]

[The Italianate Englishman]

HENRY HOWARD, EARL OF SURREY (1517–1547)

The soote season

Love, that doth reign and live within my thought

Alas! so all things now do hold their peace

Th’Assyrians’ king, in peace with foul desire

So cruel prison how could betide

Wyatt resteth here, that quick could never rest

O happy dames, that may embrace

Martial, the things that do attain

*The Fourth Book of Virgil

*[The Jilted Queen]

vii

SIR THOMAS HOBY (1530–1566)

Castiglione’s The Courtier

Book 1

[Grace]

Book 4

[The Ladder of Love]

QUEEN ELIZABETH (1533–1603)

The doubt of future foes

On Monsieur’s Departure

*Letters

*To Sir Amyas Paulet

*To Henry III, king of France

Speech to the Troops at Tilbury

*The “Golden Speech’’

ARTHUR GOLDING (1536–1605)

Ovid’s Metamorphoses

[The Golden Age]

GEORGE GASCOIGNE (1539–1578)

*Woodmanship

*ISABELLA WHITNEY (fl. 1567–1573)

*Will and Testament

EDMUND SPENSER (1552–1599)

The Shepheardes Calender

To His Booke

October

The Faerie Queene

A Letter of the Authors

Book 1

Book 2

Canto 12

[The Bower of Bliss]

Book 3

Proem

Canto 1

Canto 2

Canto 3

[The Visit to Merlin]

[Canto 4. Summary]

Canto 5

[Belphoebe and Timias]

viii

Canto 6

[Cantos 7 and 8. Summary]

[Cantos 9 and 10. Summary]

Canto 11

Canto 12

Amoretti

Sonnet 1 (“Happy ye leaves when as those lilly hands’’)

Sonnet 34 (“Lyke as a ship that through the Ocean wyde’’)

Sonnet 37 (“What guyle is this, that those her golden tresses’’)

Sonnet 54 (“Of this worlds Theatre in which we stay’’)

Sonnet 64 (“Comming to kisse her lyps [such grace I found]’’)

Sonnet 65 (“The doubt which ye misdeeme, fayre love, is vaine’’)

Sonnet 67 (“Lyke as a huntsman after weary chace’’)

Sonnet 68 (“Most glorious Lord of lyfe, that on this day’’)

Sonnet 74 (“Most happy letters fram’d by skilfull trade’’)

Sonnet 75 (“One day I wrote her name upon the strand’’)

Sonnet 79 (“Men call you fayre, and you doe credit it’’)

Epithalamion

SIR WALTER RALEGH (1552–1618)

The Nymph’s Reply to the Shepherd

What is our life?

[Sir Walter Ralegh to His Son]

The Lie

Farewell, false love

Methought I saw the grave where Laura lay

Nature, that washed her hands in milk

The Author’s Epitaph, Made by Himself

*From The discovery of the large, rich, and beautiful Empire of Guiana

*The History of the World

[Conclusion: On Death]

*THE WIDER WORLD

*FROBISHER’S VOYAGES TO THE ARCTIC, 1576–78

*From A true discourse of the late voyages of discovery

*DRAKE’S CIRCUMNAVIGATION OF THE GLOBE, 1577–80

*From The famous voyage of Sir Francis Drake into the South Sea

*AMADAS AND BARLOWE’S VOYAGE TO VIRGINIA, 1584

*From The first voyage made to Virginia

ix

*HARIOT’S REPORT ON VIRGINIA, 1585

*From A brief and true report of the new-found land of Virginia

JOHN LYLY (1554–1606)

Euphues: The Anatomy of Wit

[Euphues Introduced]

SIR PHILIP SIDNEY (1554–1586)

*The Countess of Pembroke’s Arcadia

*Book 2, Chapter 1

Astrophil and Stella

1 (“Loving in truth, and fain in verse my love to show’’)

2 (“Not at first sight, nor with a dribbèd shot’’)

5 (“It is most true that eyes are formed to serve’’)

6 (“Some lovers speak, when they their muses entertain’’)

7 (“When Nature made her chief work, Stella’s eyes’’)

9 (“Queen Virtue’s court, which some call Stella’s face’’)

10 (“Reason, in faith thou art well served, that still’’)

15 (“You that do search for every purling spring’’)

16 (“In nature apt to like when I did see’’)

18 (“With what sharp checks I in myself am shent’’)

*20 (“Fly, fly, my friends, I have my death-wound, fly’’)

21 (“Your words, my friend [right healthful caustics], blame’’)

*28 (“You that with allegory’s curious frame’’)

31 (“With how sad steps, O Moon, thou climb’st the skies’’)

37 (“My mouth doth water, and my breast doth swell’’)

39 (“Come sleep! O sleep the certain knot of peace’’)

41 (“Having this day my horse, my hand, my lance’’)

45 (“Stella oft sees the very face of woe’’)

47 (“What, have I thus betrayed my liberty?’’)

49 (“I on my horse, and Love on me doth try’’)

52 (“A strife is grown between Virtue and Love’’)

53 (“In martial sports I had my cunning tried’’)

56 (“Fie, school of Patience, fie, your lesson is’’)

61 (“Oft with true sighs, oft with uncallèd tears’’)

69 (“O joy, too high for my low style to show’’)

71 (“Who will in fairest book of Nature know’’)

72 (“Desire, though thou my old companion art’’)

74 (“I never drank of Aganippe well’’)

81 (“O kiss, which dost those ruddy gems impart’’)

Fourth Song (“Only joy, now here you are’’)

x

87 (“When I was forced from Stella ever dear’’)

89 (“Now that of absence the most irksome night’’)

91 (“Stella, while now by Honor’s cruel might’’)

Eleventh Song (“‘Who is it that this dark night’’)

108 (“When Sorrow [using mine own fire’s might]’’)

The nightingale

Thou blind man’s mark

Leave me, O Love

The Defense of Poesy

[The Lessons of Horsemanship]

[The Poet, Poetry]

[Three Kinds of Poets]

[Poetry, Philosophy, History]

[The Poetic Kinds]

[Answers to Charges against Poetry]

[Poetry in England]

[Conclusion]

FULKE GREVILLE, LORD BROOKE (1554–1628)

*Caelica

100 (“In night when colors all to black are cast’’)

Chorus Sacerdotum

ROBERT SOUTHWELL (1561–1595)

The Burning Babe

*MARY (SIDNEY) HERBERT, COUNTESS OF PEMBROKE (1562–1621)

*To the Angel Spirit of the Most Excellent Sir Philip Sidney

*Psalm 52

*Psalm 139

SAMUEL DANIEL (1562–1619)

Delia

33 (“When men shall find thy flower, thy glory pass’’)

45 (“Care-charmer Sleep, son of the sable Night’’)

46 (“Let others sing of knights and paladins’’)

*Musophilus

*[Imperial Eloquence]

MICHAEL DRAYTON (1563–1631)

Idea

To the Reader of These Sonnets

6 (“How many paltry, foolish, painted things’’)

61 (“Since there’s no help, come, let us kiss and part’’)

Ode. To the Virginian Voyage

xi

CHRISTOPHER MARLOWE (1564–1593)

+ Hero and Leander

The Passionate Shepherd to His Love

+ Doctor Faustus

The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus

*The Two Texts of Doctor Faustus

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (1564–1616)

SONNETS

1 (“From fairest creatures we desire increase’’)

3 (“Look in thy glass and tell the face thou viewest’’)

12 (“When I do count the clock that tells the time’’)

15 (“When I consider every thing that grows’’)

18 (“Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?’’)

19 (“Devouring Time, blunt thou the lion’s paws’’)

20 (“A woman’s face with Nature’s own hand painted’’)

29 (“When, in disgrace with Fortune and men’s eyes’’)

30 (“When to the sessions of sweet silent thought’’)

*33 (“Full many a glorious morning have I seen’’)

35 (“No more be grieved at that which thou hast done’’)

55 (“Not marble, nor the gilded monuments’’)

60 (“Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore’’)

65 (“Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundless sea’’)

71 (“No longer mourn for me when I am dead’’)

73 (“That time of year thou mayst in me behold’’)

74 (“But be contented; when that fell arrest’’)

87 (“Farewell: thou art too dear for my possessing’’)

94 (“They that have power to hurt and will do none’’)

97 (“How like a winter hath my absence been’’)

98 (“From you have I been absent in the spring’’)

106 (“When in the chronicle of wasted time’’)

107 (“Not mine own fears, nor the prophetic soul’’)

110 (“Alas, ’tis true I have gone here and there’’)

116 (“Let me not to the marriage of true minds’’)

126 (“O thou, my lovely boy, who in thy power’’)

127 (“In the old age black was not counted fair’’)

128 (“How oft when thou, my music, music play’st’’)

129 (“Th’ expense of spirit in a waste of shame’’)

130 (“My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun’’)

135 (“Whoever hath her wish, thou hast thy Will’’)

138 (“When my love swears that she is made of truth’’)

144 (“Two loves I have of com fort and despair’’)

xii

146 (“Poor soul, the center of my sinful earth’’)

147 (“My love is as a fever, longing still’’)

+ *Twelfth Night, or What You Will

+ King Lear

*The Two Texts of King Lear

THOMAS CAMPION (1567–1620)

My sweetest Lesbia

I care not for these ladies

When to her lute Corinna sings

Rose-cheeked Laura

There is a garden in her face

Think’st thou to seduce me then

Fain would I wed

*Now winter nights enlarge

THOMAS NASHE (1567–1601)

A Litany in Time of Plague

Pierce Penniless, His Supplication to the Devil

[The Defense of Plays]

*The Unfortunate Traveler, or The Life of Jack Wilton

*[Roman Summer]

THE EARLY SEVENTEENTH CENTURY (1603–1660)

Introduction

*Timeline

JOHN DONNE (1572–1631)

The Flea

The Good-Morrow

Song (“Go and catch a falling star”)

The Undertaking

The Sun Rising

The Indifferent

The Canonization

*Song (“Sweetest love, I do not go”)

Air and Angels

Break of Day

A Valediction: Of Weeping

Love’s Alchemy

A Nocturnal upon Saint Lucy’s Day, Being the Shortest Day

The Bait

xiii

The Apparition

A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning

The Ecstasy

The Funeral

The Blossom

The Relic

A Lecture upon the Shadow

Elegy 16. On His Mistress

Elegy 19. To His Mistress Going to Bed

+ Satire 3

The Storm

An Anatomy of the World

From The First Anniversary

HOLY SONNETS

1 (“Thou hast made me, and shall thy work decay?”)

5 (“I am a little world made cunningly”)

7 (“At the round earth’s imagined corners, blow”)

9 (“If poisonous minerals, and if that tree”)

10 (“Death, be not proud, though some have callèd thee”)

13 (“What if this present were the world’s last night?”)

14 (“Batter my heart, three-personed God; for you”)

17 (“Since she whom I loved hath paid her last debt”)

18 (“Show me, dear Christ, thy spouse so bright and clear”)

*19 (“Oh, to vex me, contraries meet in one”)

*Good Friday, 1613. Riding Westward

A Hymn to Christ, at the Author’s Last Going into Germany

Hymn to God My God, in My Sickness

A Hymn to God the Father

Devotions upon Emergent Occasions

Meditation 4

Meditation 17

From Expostulation 19 [The Language of God]

*From Death’s Duel

AEMILIA LANYER (1569–1645)

Salve Deus Rex Judaeorum

*To the Doubtful Reader

*To the Queen’s Most Excellent Majesty

*To the Virtuous Reader

Eve’s Apology in Defense of Women

+ The Description of Cooke-ham

xiv

BEN JONSON (1572–1637)

+ *The Masque of Blackness

+ Volpone, or The Fox

To My Book

On Something, That Walks Somewhere

To William Camden

On My First Daughter

To John Donne

On Don Surly

On Giles and Joan

On My First Son

*On Lucy, Countess of Bedford To Lucy, Countess of Bedford, with Mr.

Donne’s Satires

Inviting a Friend to Supper

Epitaph on S. P., a Child of Queen Elizabeth’s Chapel

To Penshurst

Song: To Celia

To Heaven

From A Celebration of Charis in Ten Lyric Pieces

*A Sonnet to the Noble Lady, the Lady Mary Wroth

My Picture Left in Scotland

+ To the Immortal Memory and Friendship of That Noble Pair, Sir Lucius Cary

and Sir H. Morison

Slow, Slow, Fresh Fount

Queen and Huntress

Still to Be Neat

To the Memory of My Beloved, The Author, Mr. William Shakespeare, and

What He Hath Left Us

Ode to Himself

From Timber: or Discoveries

MARY WROTH (1587?–1651?)

The Countess of Montgomery’s Urania

From The First Book

PAMPHILIA TO AMPHILANTHUS

1 (“When night’s black mantle could most darkness prove”)

16 (“Am I thus conquered? Have I lost the powers”)

28 Song (“Sweetest love, return again”)

*39 (“Take heed mine eyes, how you your looks do cast”)

40 (“False hope which feeds but to destroy, and spill”)

68 (“My pain, still smothered in my grievèd breast”)

74 Song (“Love a child is ever crying”)

xv

From A Crown of Sonnets Dedicated to Love

77 (“In this strange labyrinth how shall I turn?”)

*103 (“My muse now happy, lay thyself to rest”)

JOHN WEBSTER (1580?–1625?)

+ The Duchess of Malfi

*ELIZABETH CARY (1585?–1639)

*The Tragedy of Mariam, the Fair Queen of Jewry

 

*THE SCIENCE OF SELF AND WORLD

FRANCIS BACON (1561–1626)

Of Truth

Of Marriage and Single Life

Of Great Place

Of Superstition

Of Plantations

Of Negotiating

*Of Masques and Triumphs

Of Studies [1597 version]

Of Studies [1625 version]

The Advancement of Learning

[The Abuses of Language]

Novum Organum

[The Idols]

The New Atlantis

[Solomon’s House]

*MARTHA MOULSWORTH (1577–16??)

*The Memorandum of Martha Moulsworth, Widow

xvi

*RACHEL SPEGHT (ca. 1597–16??)

*From A Dream

ROBERT BURTON (1577–1640)

The Anatomy of Melancholy

*Democritus Junior to the Reader

Love Melancholy

SIR THOMAS BROWNE (1605–1682)

Religio Medici

Part 1, Sections 1–6, 9, 15, 16, 34, 59

*Part 2, Section 1

Hydriotaphia, or Urn-Burial

From Chapter 5

IZAAK WALTON (1593–1683)

The Life of Dr. John Donne

[Donne on His Deathbed]

THOMAS HOBBES (1588–1679)

Leviathan

The Introduction

[The Artificial Man]

Part 1

Chapter 1. Of Sense

From Chapter 13. Of the Natural Condition of Mankind as Concerning

Their Felicity and Misery

From Chapter 14. Of the First and Second Natural Laws

From Chapter 15. Of Other Laws of Nature

GEORGE HERBERT (1593–1633)

The Altar

Redemption

Easter

Easter Wings

Affliction (1)

Prayer (1)

Jordan (1)

Church Monuments

The Windows

Denial

Virtue

Man

xvii

Jordan (2)

Time

The Bunch of Grapes

The Pilgrimage

*The Holdfast

The Collar

The Pulley

The Flower

The Forerunners

Discipline

Death

Love (3)

HENRY VAUGHAN (1621–1695)

*A Song to Amoret

Regeneration

The Retreat

Silence, and Stealth of Days!

Corruption

Unprofitableness

The World

They Are All Gone into the World of Light!

Cock-Crowing

The Night

The Waterfall

RICHARD CRASHAW (ca. 1613–1649)

*Music’s Duel

To the Infant Martyrs

I Am the Door

On the Wounds of Our Crucified Lord

Luke 11.[27]

In the Holy Nativity of Our Lord God: A Hymn Sung as by the Shepherds

To the Noblest & Best of Ladies, the Countess of Denbigh

The Flaming Heart

ROBERT HERRICK (1591–1674)

The Argument of His Book

Upon the Loss of His Mistresses

The Vine

Dreams

Delight in Disorder

His Farewell to Sack

Corinna’s Going A-Maying

xviii

To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time

The Hock-Cart, or Harvest Home

*How Roses Came Red

Upon the Nipples of Julia’s Breast

Upon Jack and Jill. Epigram

To Marygolds

His Prayer to Ben Jonson

The Bad Season Makes the Poet Sad

The Night-Piece, to Julia

Upon His Verses

His Return to London

Upon Julia’s Clothes

Upon Prue, His Maid

To His Book’s End

To His Conscience

Another Grace for a Child

THOMAS CAREW (1595–1640)

An Elegy upon the Death of the Dean of Paul’s, Dr. John Donne

To Ben Jonson

A Song (“Ask me no more where Jove bestows”)

A Rapture

SIR JOHN SUCKLING (1609–1642)

Song (“Why so pale and wan, fond lover?”)

Loving and Beloved

*A Ballad upon a Wedding

Out upon It!

RICHARD LOVELACE (1618–1657)

To Lucasta, Going to the Wars

The Grasshopper

To Althea, from Prison

Love Made in the First Age. To Chloris

EDMUND WALLER (1606–1687)

The Story of Phoebus and Daphne Applied

Song (“Go, lovely rose!”)

ABRAHAM COWLEY (1618–1667)

Ode: Of Wit

KATHERINE PHILIPS (1632–1664)

A Married State

Upon the Double Murder of King Charles

Friendship’s Mystery, To My Dearest Lucasia

xix

To Mrs. M. A. at Parting

On the Death of My First and Dearest Child, Hector Philips

ANDREW MARVELL (1621–1678)

The Coronet

Bermudas

A Dialogue Between the Soul and Body

The Nymph Complaining for the Death of Her Fawn

To His Coy Mistress

The Definition of Love

The Picture of Little T. C. in a Prospect of Flowers

The Mower Against Gardens

Damon the Mower

The Mower to the Glowworms

The Mower’s Song

The Garden

An Horatian Ode

*Upon Appleton House

VOICES OF THE WAR

LUCY HUTCHINSON (1620–after 1675)

Memoirs of Colonel Hutchinson

[A Confrontation]

LADY ANNE HALKETT (1622–1699)

The Memoirs

[Springing the Duke]

JOHN LILBURNE (1615?–1657)

The Picture of the Council of State

[Lilburne Defies the Authorities]

GERRARD WINSTANLEY (1609–1676?)

From The True Levellers’ Standard Advanced

*ANNA TRAPNEL (1620?–1660?)

*Anna Trapnel’s Report and Plea, or, a Narrative of Her Journey from London

into Cornwall

ABIEZER COPPE (1619–1672)

From A Fiery Flying Roll

EDWARD HYDE, EARL OF CLARENDON (1609–1674)

The History of the Rebellion

[The Character of Oliver Cromwell]

xx

THOMAS TRAHERNE (1637–1674)

Centuries of Meditation

From The Third Century

Wonder

On Leaping over the Moon

MARGARET CAVENDISH (1623–1673)

*The Poetess’s Hasty Resolution

*The Hunting of the Hare

*From A True Relation of My Birth, Breeding, and Life

*From The Description of a New World, Called The Blazing World

JOHN MILTON (1608–1674)

On the Morning of Christ’s Nativity

On Shakespeare

L’Allegro

Il Penseroso

+ Lycidas

The Reason of Church Government Urged Against Prelaty

[Plans and Projects]

From Areopagitica

SONNETS

How Soon Hath Time

On the New Forcers of Conscience Under the Long Parliament

To the Lord General Cromwell, May 1652

When I Consider How My Light Is Spent

On the Late Massacre in Piedmont

Methought I Saw My Late Espousèd Saint

+ Paradise Lost

THE RESTORATION AND THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY (1660–1785)

Introduction

*Timeline

JOHN DRYDEN (1631–1700)

Annus Mirabilis

[London Reborn]

Song from Marriage à la Mode

+ Absalom and Achitophel: A Poem

+ Mac Flecknoe

To the Memory of Mr. Oldham

xxi

A Song for St. Cecilia’s Day

Epigram on Milton

Alexander’s Feast

CRITICISM

An Essay of Dramatic Poesy

[Two Sorts of Bad Poetry]

[The Wit of the Ancients: The Universal]

[Shakespeare and Ben Jonson Compared]

The Author’s Apology for Heroic Poetry and Heroic License

[“Boldness” of Figures and Tropes Defended: The Appeal to “Nature”]

[Wit as “Propriety”]

A Discourse Concerning the Original and Progress of Satire

[The Art of Satire]

The Preface to Fables Ancient and Modern

[In Praise of Chaucer]

SAMUEL PEPYS (1633–1703)

The Diary

[The Great Fire]

*[The Deb Willet Affair]

JOHN BUNYAN (1628–1688)

From Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners

The Pilgrim’s Progress

[Christian Sets out for the Celestial City]

[The Slough of Despond]

[Vanity Fair]

[The River of Death and the Celestial City]

JOHN LOCKE (1632–1704)

An Essay Concerning Human Understanding

From The Epistle to the Reader

SIR ISAAC NEWTON (1642–1727)

From A Letter of Mr. Isaac Newton

SAMUEL BUTLER (1612–1680)

Hudibras

From Part 1, Canto 1

JOHN WILMOT, SECOND EARL OF ROCHESTER (1647–1680)

The Disabled Debauchee

*The Imperfect Enjoyment

APHRA BEHN (1640?–1689)

*The Disappointment

+ Oroonoko, or The Royal Slave

xxii

WILLIAM CONGREVE (1670–1729)

+ The Way of the World

MARY ASTELL (1666–1731)

From Some Reflections upon Marriage

DANIEL DEFOE (ca. 1660–1731)

Roxana

[The Cons of Marriage]

ANNE FINCH, COUNTESS OF WINCHILSEA (1661–1720)

The Introduction

A Nocturnal Reverie

MATTHEW PRIOR (1664–1721)

An Epitaph

A True Maid

A Better Answer

JONATHAN SWIFT (1667–1745)

A Description of a City Shower

Verses on the Death of Dr. Swift

From A Tale of a Tub

Abolishing of Christianity in England

Gulliver’s Travels

A Letter from Captain Gulliver to His Cousin Sympson

The Publisher to the Reader

Part 1. A Voyage to Lilliput

Part 2. A Voyage to Brobdingnag

Part 3. A Voyage to Laputa, Balnibarbi, Glubbdubdrib, Luggnagg, and

Japan

Chapter 2 [The Flying Island of Laputa]

Chapter 5 [The Academy of Lagado]

Chapter 10 [The Struldbruggs]

Part 4. A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnhnms

A Modest Proposal

JOSEPH ADDISON (1672–1719) and SIR RICHARD STEELE (1672–1729)

THE PERIODICAL ESSAY: MANNERS

Steele: [The Gentleman; The Pretty Fellow] (Tatler 21)

Steele: [Dueling] (Tatler 25)

Steele: [The Spectator’s Club] (Spectator 2)

Addison: [Sir Roger at Church] (Spectator 112)

Addison: [Sir Roger at the Assizes] (Spectator 122)

THE PERIODICAL ESSAY: IDEAS

Addison: [The Aims of the Spectator] (Spectator 10)

xxiii

Addison: [Wit: True, False, Mixed] (Spectator 62)

Addison: [Paradise Lost: General Critical Remarks] (Spectator 267)

Addison: [On the Scale of Being] (Spectator 519)

ALEXANDER POPE (1688–1744)

+ An Essay on Criticism

+ The Rape of the Lock

Epistle to Miss Blount

Eloisa to Abelard

An Essay on Man

Epistle 1. Of the Nature and State of Man, With Respect to the Universe

From Epistle 2. Of the Nature and State of Man With Respect to Himself,

as an Individual

+ Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot

The Dunciad: Book the Fourth

[The Educator]

[The Carnation and the Butterfly]

[The Triumph of Dulness]

LADY MARY WORTLEY MONTAGU (1689–1762)

\\The Lover: A Ballad

Epistle from Mrs. Yonge to Her Husband

*DEBATING WOMEN: ARGUMENTS IN VERSE

*JONATHAN SWIFT: The Lady’s Dressing Room

*LADY MARY WORTLEY MONTAGU: The Reasons that Induced Dr. Swift to

Write a Poem Called the Lady’s Dressing Room

*ALEXANDER POPE: The Impromptu To Lady Winchelsea

*ANNE FINCH, COUNTESS OF WINCHILSEA: The Answer (To Pope’s

Impromptu)

*ALEXANDER POPE: Epistle 2. To a Lady

*ANNE INGRAM, VISCOUNTESS IRWIN: An Epistle to Mr. Pope

MARY LEAPOR: An Essay on Woman

*JOHN GAY (1685–1732)

+ *The Beggar’s Opera

*William Hogarth’s engraving for The Beggar’s Opera

*WILLIAM HOGARTH (1697–1764)

*Marriage A-la-Mode

xxiv

SAMUEL JOHNSON (1709–1784)

+ The Vanity of Human Wishes

Prologue Spoken by Mr. Garrick

On the Death of Dr. Robert Levet

Translation of Horace, Odes, Book 4.7

Rambler No. 5 [On Spring]

Idler No. 31 [On Idleness]

From The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abyssinia

Rambler No. 4 [On Fiction]

Rambler No. 60 [Biography]

A Dictionary of the English Language

From Preface

[Some Definitions: A Small Anthology]

The Preface to Shakespeare

[Shakespeare’s Excellence. General Nature]

[Shakespeare’s Faults. The Three Dramatic Unities]

*[Twelfth Night]

[King Lear]

LIVES OF THE POETS

Cowley

[Metaphysical Wit]

Milton

[Lycidas]

[L’Allegro, Il Penseroso]

[Paradise Lost]

Pope

[Pope’s Intellectual Character. Pope and Dryden Compared]

JAMES BOSWELL (1740–1795)

Boswell on the Grand Tour

[Boswell Interviews Voltaire]

The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.

[Plan of the Life]

[Johnson’s Early Years. Marriage and London]

[The Letter to Chesterfield]

[A Memorable Year: Boswell Meets Johnson]

[Goldsmith. Sundry Opinions. Johnson Meets His King]

[Fear of Death]

[Ossian. “Talking for Victory”]

[Dinner with Wilkes]

[Dread of Solitude]

[“A Bottom of Good Sense.” Bet Flint. “Clear Your Mind of Cant”]

xxv

[Johnson Prepares for Death]

[Johnson Faces Death]

*FRANCES BURNEY (1752–1840)

*The Journal and Letters

*[The First Journal Entry]

*[Mr. Barlow’s Proposal]

*[“Down with her, Burney!”]

*[A Young and Agreeable Infidel]

*[Encountering the King]

*A Mastectomy

*SLAVERY AND FREEDOM

*IGNATIUS SANCHO and LAURENCE STERNE

*A Letter to Laurence Sterne (July 21, 1766)

*Sterne’s Reply to Sancho

*Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy (1767)

*Volume 9, Chapter 6

*IGNATIUS SANCHO: From Letter to Mr. Jack Wingrave

*SAMUEL JOHNSON: [A Brief to Free a Slave]

*OLAUDAH EQUIANO: The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah

Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African, Written by Himself

*[The Middle Passage]

*[A Free Man]

JAMES THOMSON (1700–1748)

The Seasons

Autumn

[Evening and Night]

Ode: Rule, Britannia

THOMAS GRAY (1716–1771)

Ode on a Distant Prospect of Eton College

Ode on the Death of a Favorite Cat

+ Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard

WILLIAM COLLINS (1721–1759)

Ode Written in the Beginning of the Year 1746

Ode on the Poetical Character

Ode to Evening

Ode on the Death of Mr. Thomson

xxvi

CHRISTOPHER SMART (1722–1771)

Jubilate Agno

[My Cat Jeoffry]

A Song to David

OLIVER GOLDSMITH (ca. 1730–1774)

+ The Deserted Village

GEORGE CRABBE (1754–1832)

The Village

Book 1

WILLIAM COWPER (1731–1800)

The Task

Book 1

[A Landscape Described. Rural Sounds]

[Crazy Kate]

Book 3

[The Stricken Deer]

Book 4

[The Winter Evening: A Brown Study]

The Castaway

POPULAR BALLADS

Lord Randall

Bonny Barbara Allan

The Wife of Usher’s Well

The Three Ravens

Sir Patrick Spens

The Bonny Earl of Murray

POEMS IN PROCESS

John Milton

Lycidas

Alexander Pope

The Rape of the Lock

An Essay on Man

Samuel Johnson

The Vanity of Human Wishes

Thomas Gray

Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard

xxvii

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHIES

Suggested General Readings

The Middle Ages

The Sixteenth Century

The Early Seventeenth Century

The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century

*GEOGRAPHIC NOMENCLATURE

BRITISH MONEY

THE BRITISH BARONAGE

The Royal Lines of England and Great Britain

RELIGIONS IN ENGLAND

POETIC FORMS AND LITERARY TERMINOLOGY

ILLUSTRATIONS

The Universe According to Ptolemy

A London Playhouse of Shakespeare’s Time