For any situation involving people to succeed, there are explicit and implicit responsibilities each person must fulfill. Of course, this is true in a learning environment.

 

As a teacher, I must:

-clarify course policies and calendar via syllabi and class discussion

-attend class regularly and be on-time for class

-provide quality instruction

-grade assignments accurately, fairly and in a timely manner

-provide and/or seek additional assistance for students whose learning needs are not met within the classroom

-enhance my own academic capacity through various forms of professional development.

 

And, to academically succeed, students must:

-be aware of policies and calendar included on syllabi

-attend class regularly and be on-time for class

-prepare for class by as directed by the teacher

-be attentive and take good notes in class

-participate in class discussions

-carefully follow directions

-complete all assignments and turn them in on-time

-do their own work instead of choosing to cheat or plagiarize

-ask clarification questions and seek extra assistance* when needed

-prepare well for exams

-notify a teacher, in advance if at all possible, when one must be absent.

 

If teachers and students fulfill these responsibilities, learning will take place. So, why does this not always happen? As with any other environment, there is a breakdown when any party does not perform his or her expected roles.

 

As an educator, you  have my commitment and my college’s commitment that I will fulfill my responsibilities. Thus, if students do as well, everyone wins.

 

 

Another factor immensely influences the success of a learning environmentrespect.

 

In a teacher-student relationship, this means respect

-among students and faculty

-for the subject matter and its relevance and importance

-for maintaining conducive learning environments in the classroom with as few distractions as possible

-for the importance of education in general to prepare productive, successful, involved citizens.

 

CHOOSING TO CHEAT IN ANY WAY CLEARLY DISREGARDS THE CONCEPTS OF RESPONSIBILITY AND RESPECT WITHIN THE EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT.

 

 

*A tremendous resource at GHC is the Tutorial Center, located in the Rome campus library and serving other campuses as well. Many websites also host valuable information on student success, such as that located at Dartmouth.

 

 

 

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